Philosophy Kitten


I promise nothing. >^.^<

Ask me anything

Submit

theprivatelifeofsherlockholmes:

theprivatelifeofsherlockholmes:

Cross out what you’ve already read. Six is the average.

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
Harry Potter series - JK Rowling
To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
The Bible - Council of Nicea 
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
Little Women - Louisa M Alcott
Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien
Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
Middlemarch - George Eliot
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald
Bleak House - Charles Dickens
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll
The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis
Emma - Jane Austen
Persuasion - Jane Austen
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis
The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden
Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne
Animal Farm - George Orwell
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Atonement - Ian McEwan
Life of Pi - Yann Martel
Dune - Frank Herbert
Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
The Secret History - Donna Tartt
The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold 
Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
On The Road - Jack Kerouac
Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie 
Moby Dick - Herman Melville
Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
Dracula - Bram Stoker
The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett
Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
Ulysses - James Joyce 
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
Germinal - Emile Zola
Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
Possession - AS Byatt
A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
The Color Purple - Alice Walker
The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Charlotte’s Web - EB White
The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
The Little Prince - Antoine De Saint-Exupery
The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
Watership Down - Richard Adams
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole 
A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
Hamlet - William Shakespeare
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer
Paradise Lost - John Milton
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
White Fang - Jack London
The Portrait of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
Queen of the Damned - Anne Rice
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
The Call of the Wild - Jack London
The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — L. Frank Baum
Don Quixote — Miguel DeCervantes
Where the Wild Things Are — Maurice Sendak
The Cat in the Hat — Dr Seuss

The Giver — Lois Lowry
Inkheart — Cornelia Funke 
Divine Comedy — Dante Alighieri
Macbeth — William Shakespeare
Romeo and Juliet — William Shakespeare
The Child Called ‘It’ — Dave Pelzer
The Hunger Games — Suzanne Collins
The Diary of a Young Girl — Anne Frank
Night — Elie Wiesel
Les Misérables — Victor Hugo
The Odyssey — Homer
The Scarlet Letter — Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Brothers Karamasov — Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Eragon — Christopher Paolini
Song of Ice and Fire: Game of Thrones series— George R.R Martin
The Art of War— Sun Tzu
The Joy Luck Club— Amy Tan
Mary Poppins— P.L. Travers
Roots— Alex Haily
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings— Maya Aangelou
Naked Lunch—William S. Burroughs
Howl— Allen Ginsberg
Interview With a Vampire— Anne Rice
The Shining— Stephen King
Jim Hensons Labyrinth — A.G.H Smith
Percy Jackson and the Olympians— Rick Riordan
The Heroes of Olympus— Rick Riordan
The Kane Chronicles— Rick Riordan

Tagged: some of these i may have read and forgottensome i was forced to read tbhsome i didn't strike because i tried to read it because i couldn't get through the entire workclassics aren't really my thingbut love that watership down is listedand i blame my mum for the canterbury tales

Source: antoinetheswan

weescottishkid:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:


I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.
Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!
thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.
Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.
Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.
Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.
And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.
You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is super interesting because that kind of constant put downs and stuff and only being accepted by the wrong people is how people end up in white supremacist gangs

I always thought that was suppose to be the point JK was going for, but I feel like she changed a lot more than she even realized or has admitted to after fan reactions starting influencing the story. 
It&#8217;s been quite a while since I read the books but I suspect that she either left the ending too open so fans could keep that &#8216;we got the bad guys&#8217; victory. Or it was like Dumbledore&#8217;s sexuality, and she didn&#8217;t make it &#8216;clear enough&#8217; for some people.
But I mean, I always thought the entire point to the series was not to be prejudice. Not against giants, werewolves, or house-elves. Not all criminals are bad. Not all heroes are good. Muggles aren&#8217;t &#8216;dirty&#8217; and wizards aren&#8217;t &#8216;evil&#8217;. I never realized really until I started seeing Tumblr fandom posts that people still disliked Slytherin?
I mean, wtf. You just read seven books telling you not to judge people based on their species, powers, or appearance. But sure - judge them based on their house.

weescottishkid:

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:

I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.

Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!

thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.

Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.

Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.

Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.

And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.

You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

This is super interesting because that kind of constant put downs and stuff and only being accepted by the wrong people is how people end up in white supremacist gangs

I always thought that was suppose to be the point JK was going for, but I feel like she changed a lot more than she even realized or has admitted to after fan reactions starting influencing the story.

It’s been quite a while since I read the books but I suspect that she either left the ending too open so fans could keep that ‘we got the bad guys’ victory. Or it was like Dumbledore’s sexuality, and she didn’t make it ‘clear enough’ for some people.

But I mean, I always thought the entire point to the series was not to be prejudice. Not against giants, werewolves, or house-elves. Not all criminals are bad. Not all heroes are good. Muggles aren’t ‘dirty’ and wizards aren’t ‘evil’. I never realized really until I started seeing Tumblr fandom posts that people still disliked Slytherin?

I mean, wtf. You just read seven books telling you not to judge people based on their species, powers, or appearance. But sure - judge them based on their house.

Source: zaynx

565mae10:

I made a banner in celebration of Asexual Awareness week! Reblog to spread the message and show your support!

565mae10:

I made a banner in celebration of Asexual Awareness week! Reblog to spread the message and show your support!

Source: 565mae10

Things you didn’t know about Brave (by Oh My Disney)

Source: mickeyandcompany

'That's a harp he's playing, Nobby,' said one of them, after watching Imp for a while.
‘Lyre.’
‘No, it’s the honest truth, I’m-’ The fat guard frowned and looked down.
‘You’ve just been waiting all your life to say that, ain’t you, Nobby,’ he said. ‘I bet you was born hoping that one day someone’d say “That’s a harp” so you could say “lyre”, on account of it being a pun or play on words. Well, har har.’
Terry Pratchett, Soul Music (via discworldquotes)